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Let's Talk Effectuation with Sara Whiffen

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Tuesday, March 31, 2015

There's More to Affordable Risk in Higher Ed. 

By: Sara Whiffen, Insights Ignited

Sara.whiffen@insightsignited.com

When we talk about Affordable Risk in the context of our colleges it becomes clear that there are a set of special risks that exist in the organizational context that are unique to higher education. We asked Sara Whiffen, Effectuation consultant to the NACCE Coleman Foundation Grant Community of Practice to share her perspectives on this topic and here are her top 5 special risks.

1.   Bureaucratic risk- How much are you willing to go off plan?

2.   Cultural risk- Is there a lack of universal understanding about effectuation? Are you culturally disassociated- do you feel like the odd man out?

3.   Reputation risk- The risk of being too far out of the norm- swimming upstream.

4.   Failure risk- Being branded as the failure- it is inherent in entrepreneurship, but not so with institutions.

5.   Solopreneur risk- The idea that as the manager of an entrepreneurship program you have the sole responsibility for entrepreneurship- “lone wolf” doesn’t work it requires shared creation.

Do you see this on your campus? Can you think of other affordable risks you see in the organizational environment? Chime in on the effectuation conversation.

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  economic development  effectuation  entrepreneurial mindset  entrepreneurship  higher education  insights ignited  NACCE 

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Spotlight on #PHXstartupweek

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Monday, March 2, 2015

By: Jeff Saville, Gateway CEI, Phoenix AZ

Email contact: jeff.saville@ceigateway.com 

 

The end of February saw the spotlight shine bright on the greater Phoenix area and its burgeoning entrepreneurial scene. Phoenix Startup Week, powered by Chase, was a celebration of local startups, their supporters, and our cities. From Scottsdale to Tempe to downtown Phoenix, the week was filled with presentations from some of the best entrepreneurial talent in the community.

 

The Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation was one of the stops during the week as CEI showcased a growing subculture within the ecosystem: medical device startups. In partnership with MedicoVentures and Phoenix Analysis Design & Technologies (PADT), the afternoon featured Bret Larsen of eVisit, Kent Dicks of Alere Connect, and Matthew Likens of Ultera, Inc., offering their perspectives on the growth and commercialization process for med tech companies. The event culminated with tours of PADT “Startup Labs” at CEI, which features 3D printing and design opportunities for entrepreneurs throughout Phoenix – with a particular focus on medical devices. (For more info, read AZ Tech Beat’s recap: http://aztechbeat.com/2015/02/3d-printing-cei-gateway-padt-phxstartupweek)

 

Overall, every startup ecosystem needs defining moments such as these to gain additional support from the general community – particularly the "uninitiated" outsiders – and to generate local and national exposure for its entrepreneurial initiatives. For at least one week, greater Phoenix incubators, accelerators, co-working spaces, support organizations, corporate partners, and of course entrepreneurs consciously abstained from “operation in isolation” and joined forces to share their stories and learn about one another’s efforts. And we certainly consider Phoenix Startup Week a huge success as a result.

 

To reference Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton’s tweet on the week: “Nearly [2000] registered, [we are] ready to energize our entrepreneurial ecosystem.”


Here’s to doing it all over again next year!

Tags:  community college  economic development  effectuation  entrepreneurial mindset  entrepreneurship  Gateway CEI  Maricopa Corporate College  NACCE 

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Eastern WV Community & Technical College Gets the Whole Community Speaking Effectuation

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Monday, February 23, 2015

Opportunities for Business Startups Available in Wardensville by Jean Flanagan

Reprint Courtesy of the Moorefield Examiner Newspaper, Moorefield WV February 4, 2015

As community colleges and NACCE members we talk about Effectuation (the Entrepreneurial Method) frequently, but Entrepreneur in Residence Joe Kapp & Eastern WV CTC President Chuck Terrell are taking it to the streets of their community and making it part of the local vocabulary on entrepreneurship and small business. Check out this great front page article from their local newspaper. This is definitely "Entrepreneurship in Action". 

For more information contact Joe Kapp at Joseph.Kapp@easternwv.edu


 Attached Files:

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  Eastern West Virginia Community and Technical Coll  economic development  effectuation  entrepreneurial mindset  entrepreneurship  NACCE 

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Patrick Henry Community College's Effectual Journey

Posted By Kimberly Buck, Friday, January 30, 2015

Kimberly Buck
Community Development Coordinator
Patrick Henry Community College
kbuck@patrickhenry.edu 

 

Our small city in southern Virginia was built on entrepreneurship – and we believe it’s the key to revitalizing our area. Together with NACCE, a grant from the Coleman Foundation, and our crazy quilt, Patrick Henry Community College is introducing effectual thinking to our students, staff, and the public.

Once upon a time, at the turn of the previous century, a group of enterprising young businessmen turned a small tobacco town into a hub of furniture and textile production. Martinsville was the Sweatshirt Capital of the World for some time, and it all began with a handful of entrepreneurs starting small businesses that turned into international corporations. Now that much of our former industry has moved overseas, our economy is shifting and making a comeback. Our focus with our Coleman grant is on training people to be their own bosses, to start businesses that can’t be outsourced, to add to our local quality of life and employ our neighbors. We also want to show our stakeholders how effectual thinking can be applied to solve problems and come up with innovative solutions.

PHCC has a great entrepreneurship and small business management program on the credit side of the house that is taught by a successful local businessman. We have worked with NACCE for more than a year to introduce effectual principles to our faculty, staff, and local business leaders. However, we needed to take our efforts to the next level and bring these valuable lessons campus and community-wide.

Last spring, we piloted two entrepreneurial programs, hosting the area’s first Martinsville Mini Maker Faire and a Jump Start! Student Entrepreneurship weekend. Though we had a very short turnaround time to market these events and drum up registrations, there was a great response from the community. The Mini Maker Faire, a free and family-friendly festival of innovation, drew more than 200 members of the public. The Jump Start weekend was marketed to local high school and college students and offered a “crash course” on effectuation and the nuts and bolts of starting a business. More than 20 students signed up and spent their Friday evening and all day Saturday in the workshops, and two new businesses resulted from our program. This showed us that there is a need and a hunger for entrepreneurial education in our community.

We applied to the Coleman Foundation to continue and expand these efforts to encourage innovation and entrepreneurial thinking, as well as providing professional development to our staff. After learning from the NACCE conference how other community colleges are implementing effectuation, we’ve made some strategic pivots and revised our plan. We’ve had to make lemonade when our original plan of a campus-wide rollout in January was not possible, and when a planned speaker proved too expensive for our budget.

First, we decided to take it a bit slower for deeper implementation. We plan to bring a speaker here to “train the trainers” on our campus this semester and then roll out the campus-wide initiative at the beginning of the fall semester. One of our Birds in Hand is the campus SCALE team, which stands for the Southern Center for Active Learning Excellence. The team is comprised of six certified instructors on the PHCC faculty from a variety of disciplines who have successfully delivered trainings to more than 120 other colleges. They will be empowered this spring to disseminate the effectuation message well beyond the end of the grant period.

Also, our Jump Start weekend has changed form. We’re working with members of our Crazy Quilt to bring the Extreme Entrepreneurship tour to Martinsville. (If you were fortunate enough to meet Sheena Lindahl at the NACCE conference, this is her company.) Students who participate in our entrepreneurship event will be eligible to compete in a pitch competition for prizes to get their business idea off the ground.

Partnership gives us a chance to combine our financial and human resources with another workforce organization and the local high schools to make this exciting tour happen. That doesn’t mean this is an easy process – the more partners in our quilt, the longer it takes to make decisions and schedule events. But, together, we will touch a larger audience and will be able to make something happen that formerly was out of reach.

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  economic development  effectuation  innovation  NACCE  Patrick Henry Community College 

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Let's Talk Effectuation with Sara Whiffen

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Monday, December 15, 2014

This month we are going to share in a conversation with the Coleman Foundation Entrepreneurial Colleges in Action grantees on a question that many of us deal with on our campuses every day. Please comment on this posting with your thoughts, ideas, and challenges.

“How do you talk about effectuation with internal and external stakeholders at your college?”

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  economic development  effectuation  entrepreneurship  NACCE 

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Houston Community College Strengthens Internal and External Alliances With Coleman Grant

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Submitted by: Sandra Louvier, Director, Center for Entrepreneurship, Houston Community College, HCC NW  (2013/2014 Coleman Grant Awardee, NACCE Membership Ambassador, AACC Slingshot College) 

Houston Community College’s 2013/2014 Coleman Foundation Grant Project has been dedicated to Creating and Expanding Internal and External Teams Dedicated to Entrepreneurship.  In the past seven years our partnerships have been highly effective and dynamic and they have allowed us to grow our entrepreneurial offerings.  With our grant activities we sought to deepen our partnerships by creating an Entrepreneurship and Economic Development Consortium made up of internal and external partners. We collaborated to plan and hold five events as follows:  1) Business Plan Competition Reception, 2) Grow Through Exporting Seminar, 3) Enterprise Skills Faculty Development Workshop, 4) Small Business Growth Summit and 5) Veteran Entrepreneurship Workshop.  Our activities also served to increase entrepreneurs’ engagement at HCC, leverage both college and community assets and create buzz and broad exposure of HCC’s commitment to entrepreneurship.  

Entrepreneurship and Economic Development Consortium & Five Fabulous Events The EEDC was convened early in the grant timeline, broke into collaborative committees for event planning and the EEDC convenes again in August to wrap up grant activities and plan for the future.  The Business Plan Competition Reception was held in January in collaboration with some of our closest and most long-standing partners and served as a feeder event into the Business Plan Competition which is a working competition held from January through April each year. The EEDC met in February and included internal reps from varying HCC entrepreneurial initiatives (Office of Entrepreneurial Initiatives, 10,000 Small Businesses, Minority Business Development Agency, International Business and Entrepreneurship faculty).   External Partners included the SBA, SCORE, banks, local chamber and economic development council, Newspring (Business Plan Competition partner), local entrepreneurs and others.  We proceeded to plan and hold additional grant events in March, April and May and another is planned in August.   

Business Plan Competition Reception  01/09/14:  Past Contestants, BPC Leaders and Prize Sponsors gathered to mix and mingle with Applicants for the 2014 Competition at Wallis State Bank.  BPC leaders spoke of things to come in the 2014 competition and past contestants gave testimonials about how the competition propelled them forward.  The event strengthened our applicant pool and helped lead to our best competition ever!  Check out our photos:  https://plus.google.com/photos/117725629534571468084/albums/5969367356903362577 

Entrepreneurship and Economic Development Consortium (EEDC Mtg) 02/26/14:  Dr. Zachary Hodges, President, HCC NW welcomed an outstanding team of internal and external partners to the Entrepreneurship and Economic Development Consortium held at HCC Spring Branch on February 26.  Top leadership support continued throughout the entire grant period in that Zach Hodges, Maya Durnovo (Chief Entrepreneurial Initiatives Officer –HCC District) and Evelyn Velasquez (Interim Dean of Workforce & Economic Development, HCC NW) supported and played roles in the planning and execution of every grant event.   Check out our photos: https://plus.google.com/photos/117725629534571468084/albums/5986726293210428721

Grow Through Exporting  03/21/14:  The registrant list was as follows: 56 small business owners, 10 small business employees, 31 Students, 40 aspiring exporters, and 3 graduates of 10,000 Small Businesses, including 20 business owners doing over $150,000 in revenues, 22 already exporting & 52 who indicated specific products they want to begin exporting.  All made great connections for follow-up with presenters from the Department of Commerce-International Trade Association, Small Business Administration, HCC International Business Dept., HCC Entrepreneurship, Export-Import Bank and Wallis State Bank.  Each attendee chose next Action Steps to pursue their exporting goals.  Check out our photos:  https://plus.google.com/photos/117725629534571468084/albums/5993700898163629665 

Power of Choice – Faculty Development Workshop   HCC faculty joined Professor Linda Koffel for a thought provoking seminar on “Enterprise Skills: The New Survival Mindset.”  Koffel stated “Entrepreneurial skills are the survival skills of the new economic environment including the ability to direct one’s fate, to create one’s future, to develop one’s talents and potential.  The new survival skills all revolve around one major trait — controlling one’s own fate through creative problem solving, persistence, risk taking, being proactive, educating oneself and gaining the appropriate knowledge to reach goals.”  HCC faculty from across the system gathered to share and brainstorm about how they teach students 21st Century enterprise skills in academic and workforce classes.  Instructors participated in interactive exercises, shared creative lessons and inspired each other as they planned new lessons for fall classes.  Check out our photos:   https://plus.google.com/photos/117725629534571468084/albums/6002132610087904913 

Small Business Growth Summit  HCC surrounded entrepreneurs with the might of the Houston entrepreneurial eco-system on May 16 at the Spring 2014 Small Business Summit.  The purpose:  Ignite entrepreneurial thinking through owners, leaders and employees as the catalyst that will drive 21st Century economic growth. Keynote speakers Liz Townsend and Anthony Milton grew My Fit Foods into a national chain and these serial entrepreneurs are now launching and/or growing multiple concepts.  The platform: inspiring, insightful, interactive presentations, panels and workshops and networking with empowering resource partners.  The auditorium was filled with nearly 100 existing and aspiring entrepreneurs who benefited from the 16 experts featured on the agenda and from networking with representatives of 20 resource support partners from the Houston entrepreneurial eco-system.  Check out our photos: https://plus.google.com/photos/117725629534571468084/albums/6017733677951544657  

Veteran Entrepreneurship Workshop  For Veterans who want to start a small business and for Veterans who are Solopreneurs or Micro-Entrepreneurs and want to grow. Presentations: HCC Center for Entrepreneurship and HCC Admissions Adviser/Counselor., SBA, SCORE, Women Veterans Business Center.  Progressive Roundtables - Featuring Veteran Entrepreneurs and Veteran Instructors (5 Tables).  Each Veteran Entrepreneur leader leads a table by talking about past success as an entrepreneur and their business and/or ties to HCC Entrepreneurship (BPC or class, etc.) for 5-7 minutes, and then leaders takes Q&A from those at the table for 7-10 minutes for a total of 15 minutes at the roundtable. The bell rings and each leader moves to the next table and does the same thing with a new table of attendees for the next 15 minutes.  This will repeat for five 15-minute intervals. Lunch and Exhibitor Networking What NACCE resources are helping you reach these goals?  

Key Takeaways: 
NACCE/Coleman Foundation’s Community of Practice benefitted us greatly. Monthly group calls allowed the eleven winning colleges to share best practices and helped us resolve some challenges and avert others.  One-on-one calls with the NACCE appointed EICA leader who was also a former grant recipient college helped colleges understand and meet grant requirements. One example: we expanded  our internal and external partner list to include more knowing that some might not be able to attend EEDC meetings but would appreciated being included and that they would collaborate via phone and through one-on-one meetings when necessary. 

Survey and Measure Before and After. On-Line Registration form for events can be leveraged to collect meaningful data for target audience and build a database for future related events.  If enough information is collected up front, the college can market to attendees and no shows for future events.  Although time consuming, measurement can lead to more business and opportunities later. 

Be Willing to Adapt Plans as good feedback and advice comes in from internal and external partners.  Example, we revised our Small Business Summit to showcase HCC’s wide breadth of entrepreneurial initiatives, rather than focusing solely on start-ups and micro entrepreneurs as initially planned. We created sub-committee planning meetings between events to stay focused on specific goals.  We adjusted dates to accommodate internal and external partner needs.  

Collaborative Promotion Builds Success. External and internal partner alliances to promote events to our databases built registration and attendance and celebrated our success internally and externally to the broader business community. 

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  economic development  entrepreneurship  Houston Community College  NACCE 

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Listen to Your Entrepreneurs and Don’t Feel Like You Have to Plan Every Minute

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Monday, June 30, 2014
Updated: Monday, June 30, 2014
Submitted by Amy Schulz, Director of Career and Technical Education, Economic Workforce Development
Feather River College
aschulz@frc.edu  

Feather River College received a Coleman Entrepreneurship in Action Grant at the 2013 NACCE Conference to Increase Entrepreneurs' Engagement in Community Colleges through an entrepreneurship succession planning and internship project. Since this was a grant-funded project, we initially thought the activities should be very structured and planned. It doesn’t always work that way in entrepreneurship. We learned that entrepreneurs enjoy the space to be able to reflect. Monthly planning meetings turned into a time of reflection and wonderful unexpected collaborations across sectors. Our advice for engaging entrepreneurs from the community: Build the framework for meetings, book the space, provide food, get out of the way and LISTEN.

So, here is the story of one of our program participants so you can see what it really means to engage with your entrepreneurs and be ready to take the journey with them.

Roxanne Valladao is a living legend in Plumas County. As executive director of Plumas Arts, she is known for bringing in top notch talent to perform in rural and remote Plumas County for over 30 years. Under her leadership at Plumas Arts, she has saved a 150 year-old theatre which earns revenue from playing first run feature films while serving as the cultural heart of community and a venue for live performances. She converted a run-down dive bar on Main Street into a beautiful gallery and retail space, providing entrepreneurial opportunities for local artisans. Her efforts in promoting the arts as a key to cultural and economic development have not gone unnoticed. Tiny Plumas Arts is one of the highest ranking arts commissions in the whole state of California.  When Roxanne and board president, Kara Rockett, participated in the Feather River College Business Succession Pilot, funded by the Coleman Foundation, folks became concerned. Rumors swirled around town. “Is Roxanne retiring?”  “What is Plumas Arts going to do without her?” “Are we still going to get the great talent to come to Quincy?”

Roxanne just turned 60, and she is planning to retire in the next 2-5 years, but not now. The Business Succession Planning pilot was the perfect opportunity to explore succession and to be proactive about how the torch is passed. Like many entrepreneurs, Roxanne has poured her heart and soul into Plumas Arts, building an organization over decades and sustaining it during lean times. Plumas Arts is very personal to her—it is her legacy. It’s not so easy to hand over to just anyone, and it’s not so easy to think about either. After some prompting from the state arts commission, which ranked Plumas Arts as excellent in every category except in succession planning, Roxanne decided to jump on board the Feather River College project.

The Business Succession Planning pilot combines the resources of the college’s entrepreneurship program with those of the internship program. By pairing student mentees with established mentors, the process could be facilitated and documented through the infrastructure of the college programs.  After enrolling in the internship class, Kara as board president was in a good position to participate as a mentee. Kara brings in the perspective and practical concerns of the board and to understand what needs to happen for an eventual transition. Kara could possibly be Roxanne’s successor when and if the time is right. Together Roxanne and Kara have explored delicate issues, such as staffing on a budget and transferring institutional knowledge that Roxanne and her veteran staff know innately. They have also faced the emotional side of succession together. Kara’s sensitivity and good intentions have made this a welcome and joyous process for Roxanne, which she was originally dreading.  

An unexpected benefit of this pairing has been their influence in the community. Just the fact that Roxanne was participating got the community to take notice. What started as concern for the future of Plumas Arts has turned into a healthy dialogue around the future of our local economy and the number of aging entrepreneurs. Who will be the next generation and take over established and beloved businesses and organizations, from non-profits to appliance repair? The magic of the grapevine has been the most powerful marketing tool, and entrepreneurs have approached the team at Feather River College for help with their succession planning. After reviewing and documenting the results of this pilot which included a total of three mentor/mentee pairings, Feather River College and NACCE are releasing a video to share this and more results from our project as well as making information available through our website. In addition, we are planning to continue this project in the Fall 2014 Semester through internships. For more information, please contact Amy Schulz at aschulz@frc.edu. 

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  economic development  entrepreneurship  Feather River College  NACCE  Plumas Arts  succession planning 

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