Contact Us   |   Print Page   |   Your Cart   |   Sign In   |   Register
NACCE Blog
Blog Home All Blogs

What A Difference A Year Makes

Posted By Kaskaskia College _, Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Getting into the final stretch of our second Coleman Foundation & ECIA year, I would like to share some of the differences between year one and year two. On a recent commute, this summary came to mind:

Year 1 Effectuation Efforts- First I learned the principles and then I taught them

Year 2 Effectuation Efforts- I made big strides in understanding the principles and have become a much better teacher

In Year Two, we still value our checklist and pursue our goals but our mindset is different- we are much more open to the journey and the experiences encountered. As a result, our rewards are larger and our effectual sustainability is more assured.

Sara Whiffen of Insights Ignited helped me to develop professionally and I would like to share some lessons learned & things that really gave our projects better direction:

1. "The future is unknowable but it is creatable" is a concept that draws in co-creators. It enabled us to convince others that we can operate on similar footing to that of famous entrepreneurs.

2. "Begin with where you are" removes the non-productive comparisons and allows progress to get underway. Yes, there are healthy comparisons to be made... just drop the coveting & the envy thoughts.

3. Design answers to "what is in it for me- WIIFM" before every group and listener. This is how to move beyond polite listeners and to attract co-creators. Remember to always ask for involvement.

4. Every interaction is good. It is impossible to predict which ones are going to help you and how they will help... "You are part of my crazy quilt."

5. When strengthening your internal team, get to the point where you can frame discussions by saying "Now we do 'X', in an effectual world we would do ______________."

6. Don't scare entrepreneurs away with information overload. You still want them to jump in and try.

At Kaskaskia College, our president of fourteen years retires at the end of the month- the signer of our PFEP. It will be up to our Institute for Entrepreneurial Success to enthuse and inform our new President Dr. Penny Quinn about NACCE, the Coleman Foundation and our effectuation journey. We are confident about accomplishing our mission!

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  effectuation  entrepreneurial mindset  entrepreneurship  insights ignited  Kaskaskia College  PFEP 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Turning Oranges into Lemonade: A Lesson in the Entrepreneurial Method

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Friday, April 24, 2015
Updated: Friday, April 24, 2015

By: Sara Whiffen, Insights Ignited (Effectuation expert for the Coleman ECIA Community of Practice)

Email: sara.whiffen@insightsignited.com

Lilly Pulitzer’s perky patterns incited a mad rush at Target stores this week. Customers were in a frenzy to acquire the bright colors and floral designs that are the hallmark of the preppy brand.  The brand evokes feelings of country clubs and lazy summer lemonade days.  But its creation is rooted in orange juice.

As the story goes, long before Lilly Pulitzer was a brand, she was a wealthy socialite.  Raised in high society New York, she married and moved to Florida where her husband owned a large orange grove. 

Wanting to help with the family business, she would often push a small cart of fresh oranges through a local park.  Dressed in her cool summer whites, she would sell fresh orange juice to passers-by.   Peeling and squeezing the oranges by hand left her with sticky fingers and stained clothing.  Conscious of her appearance, this was just not acceptable to her. 

Inspiration struck one day as she glanced at a set of curtains in her home and thought that the loud, colorful pattern of their 1960s style would surely disguise those persistent orange stains.  She went to a fabric store, purchased a similar design, and fashioned from it a simple shift dress.

Wearing this in the park while pushing her cart, she stood out among the crisp white outfits worn by others.  Her look began to attract as much attention as her fresh orange juice.  Customers began asking for not just a glass of juice, but inquiring as to where they too could purchase a similar dress.  After hearing more and more of these inquiries, she began to make some of the dresses for others.  Her popularity grew and she was able to build an entire brand line from this small start. 

The effectual lemonade principal is clear here.  Her business at the time was selling orange juice.  She did not aspire to grow a fashion brand.  But she was open to trying new things and believed in her ability to solve problems in a way that would work to her advantage.  And when life gave her lemons – or orange juice – she embraced them fully and made her own lemonade.  

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  effectuation  entrepreneurial mindset  entrepreneurship  insights ignited  lilly pulitzer  NACCE  target 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Reaching & Engaging Administrative Staff

Posted By Kaskaskia College _, Sunday, April 19, 2015
Updated: Sunday, April 19, 2015

Kaskaskia College is part of the Coleman ECIA Project. In a previous post, we covered Reaching & Engaging Faculty plus the ah-ha discoveries about how to present "what's-in-it-for-me?"or WIIFM. In recent weeks we have tackled the same topic for administrative staffers and non-teaching personnel. We have been concerned that support staff do not look at what they do as entrepreneurial, and question why be entrepreneurial at all? Early in the project we tried to discuss intrapreneurs and obtained modest success, or at least polite listening. In our opinion however when you want to push beyond this polite listening, you must get right back to WIIFM. We see this as key to locating active buy-in and co-creators. So, here is an outline of elements to consider when reaching and engaging administrative staff:

1. What is expected from your staff? (Know where they are coming from & what is important to them)

a. Manage & use resources effectively

b. Assure compliance with rules & regulations

c. Assist faculty in creating a positive & comprehensive learning environment

d. Provide a broad learning experience that meets diverse needs

e. Be a productive and vibrant part of the community

f. Keep track of everything

2. What challenges does staff face? (What makes their jobs challenging & stressful)

a. The pressure to be less place bound (delivery of services convenient to citizens and not necessarly to school)

b. Meet expectations for immediate service

c. Adopt/adapt to changing technology

d. Continuous improvement in efficiency

e. A feeling that everything is "all about the numbers"

f. Creating individualized learning experiences in an efficient manner

g. Coping with generational differences

h. Dealing with budget and staff cuts

Only after engaging, listening and coming to understand the staffers can effective futures be created together. We think that conversations must focus on the individuals, not just the employee. Effectuation can build self confidence and equip individuals or teams to confront challenges faced. Effectuation principles can help illuminate pathways to solutions and help to maximize resources allocated. As in all things, once you respect and understand others, productive synergies can occur.

A summer goal for Kaskaskia College is to have a cross functional, effectual group begin to do "compare & contrast" exercises: "Today we do "X" and in an effectual world we would do _________________." When we achieve this, we will know that we have made great strides with entrepreneurship.

 

 

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  effectuation  entrepreneurial mindset  entrepreneurship  intrapreneur  Kaskaskia College  WIIFM 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Let's Talk Effectuation with Sara Whiffen

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Tuesday, March 31, 2015

There's More to Affordable Risk in Higher Ed. 

By: Sara Whiffen, Insights Ignited

Sara.whiffen@insightsignited.com

When we talk about Affordable Risk in the context of our colleges it becomes clear that there are a set of special risks that exist in the organizational context that are unique to higher education. We asked Sara Whiffen, Effectuation consultant to the NACCE Coleman Foundation Grant Community of Practice to share her perspectives on this topic and here are her top 5 special risks.

1.   Bureaucratic risk- How much are you willing to go off plan?

2.   Cultural risk- Is there a lack of universal understanding about effectuation? Are you culturally disassociated- do you feel like the odd man out?

3.   Reputation risk- The risk of being too far out of the norm- swimming upstream.

4.   Failure risk- Being branded as the failure- it is inherent in entrepreneurship, but not so with institutions.

5.   Solopreneur risk- The idea that as the manager of an entrepreneurship program you have the sole responsibility for entrepreneurship- “lone wolf” doesn’t work it requires shared creation.

Do you see this on your campus? Can you think of other affordable risks you see in the organizational environment? Chime in on the effectuation conversation.

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  economic development  effectuation  entrepreneurial mindset  entrepreneurship  higher education  insights ignited  NACCE 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Let's Talk Effectuation with Sara Whiffen

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Monday, March 23, 2015
Updated: Monday, March 23, 2015

 

What is Affordable Loss?

By: Sara Whiffen, Insights Ignited

sara.whiffen@insightsignited.com 

 

We asked our Coleman ECIA Community of Practice Effectuation Expert Sara Whiffen to weigh in on a good definition of the Affordable Loss principle and how it relates to community colleges as we teach and advise prospective and current entrepreneurs. Here's what Sara had to say.


  • Affordable loss is what you are willing to lose to make the idea successful.
  • What it is not—it is not expected return. It is not a forecasted upside.
  • Most importantly, it is not a desire to lose money.

It’s not saying that you’re going to throw it away or intentionally lose money. Instead, it’s saying that if you have to lose it, it won’t bankrupt you. It’s the recognition that innovation is based on experimentation and failures that lead to successes.


Affordable loss is the safety net in response to “true” uncertainty. Making decisions in the presence of uncertainty is the essence of entrepreneurship – economists tell us this. There is known. Unknown. And Unknowable risk. Affordable loss is how you can venture into the Unknowable territory. To truly be innovative you have to go there. Affordable loss serves as your safety net in this.

 

It sets you up for more options in the future. Entrepreneurship is a marathon, not a sprint. 

 

Stay tuned because in Sara's next blog she will share the perspective of affordable loss as it relates to the intrapreneur within the community college.

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  effectuation  entrepreneurship  Insights Ignited  NACCE 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Crazy Quilt – Boss by Commitment

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Monday, March 16, 2015

By: Bruce McHenry, Business Faculty, South Mountain Community College, Phoenix, AZ

Email: bruce.mchenry@southmountaincc.edu

As one of the colleges in the Community of Practice for this year’s Entrepreneurial College in Action grant – Powered by the Coleman Foundation – we’re spending a lot of time talking, presenting, and thinking about Effectuation and the Effectual Cycle.  One of our observations: as we build the Crazy Quilt of self-selected co-creators – we are gaining “bosses by commitment”.  In our formal positions on campus, faculty, staff, administrator, etc., we have a role and a responsibility to our bosses in their role.  As faculty, I have a Division Chair, a Dean, a Vice President and a President.  All have formal authority as defined by the lines and boxes on the organization chart. 

By contrast when we meet a co-creator who hears about our Bird in Hand (means) and Affordable Loss (risk) and Goals – when that person commits and self-selects to join our Quilt – we have made them a boss by commitment.  They have no formal authority, but by committing we now have an obligation to them and they have obligation to us.  With a new co-creator our quilt has gained new means and possibly a different risk of loss.  We must evaluate that.  With new means we may have new goals.  Those new goals may mean a loss of autonomy as I’m now moving jointly (I was desperately trying for some pun here about knitting the quilt but fail!) with that new boss, whose commitment makes them one of the Pilots-in-the-Plane. Sounds a touch scary, but in reality very fun!  We’re getting to engage with all sorts of committed folks who are opening up new opportunities for our students and community entrepreneurs.  More good news to come!

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  effectuation  entrepreneurial mindset  entrepreneurship  NACCE  south mountian community college 

Share |
PermalinkComments (1)
 

Let's Talk Effectuation with Sara Whiffen

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Thursday, February 26, 2015

The numbers behind Effectuation- How do we show progress in the Entrepreneurial College?

By: Sara Whiffen, Insights Ignited

Email: sara.whiffen@insightsignited.com

 

Consider evaluating your effectual activities in three primary buckets:

    1. Actions  -- Things I did
    2. Activities – How others got involved
    3. Impact – What the outcomes were

Use Qualitative Tracking:

Marketing as a discipline has faced similar challenges (Brand awareness, Customer loyalty, Customer Relationships).

 

What can we learn from them? 

1.     Process:  Define; Measure; Report; Refine

2.     What’s the effectual equivalent of Customer Relationships, Stakeholders, Presales?·      

 

Are there other ideas?  Try tracking mindset change

 

Try framing Qualitative Measurement using the 5 Principles of Effectuation:

1.     Bird in Hand- Did you discover / use any previously slack assets?  Identify things borrowed / recycled rather than purchased.

2.     Affordable Loss- How did you manage to a minimal investment until you saw the idea take root? 

3.     Crazy Quilt- What actions have you taken to nurture co-creative relationships? What ways did you foster for people to create connections? How was a diverse population exposed to your process, so as to increase resources and co-creation opportunities?  What did your stakeholders bring to the project?  Have you made any new relationships?  Engaged any new stakeholders?  Who and what do they bring to the project? 

4.     Lemonade- What did you put in place to remain flexible and take advantage of opportunities as they arise? Did you make any changes to the plan based on new information / partners / resources? 

5.     Pilot in Plane-  What positive externalities did you receive from this worldview? Are people on your team thinking effectually?  Do they feel more confident /optimistic / more in control?   

 

Let’s not forget the Quantitative tracking:

1.     Bird in Hand-  How were costs reduced by using existing resources? 

2.     Affordable Loss-  Manage to a “spending” or “investment” budget of no more than…$x. 

3.     Crazy Quilt-   Stakeholders – how many are participating?  Are any of these new to your group?  Note:  This is not about getting the most.  But about growing awareness of the co-creation principle through consideration.  How many stakeholders invested more this time than previously? How many stakeholders brought new voices to the table? Percentage increase in number of stakeholders. Number of new areas entered with partners.  Number of students engaged.  Number of community members engaged.

4.     Lemonade-  Dollars saved due to unanticipated acts.  Positive outcomes due to unanticipated acts

5.     Pilot in Plane-  Percentage of time you / your team spend “effectuating”.  Percentage decrease in costs to experiment. Percentage of new ideas tried.  Number of failures (If you’re not failing, you’re not trying – and you’re not learning). Percentage of people impacted / reached by the new idea (remember to define “impacted” at beginning of project). Use these to set a baseline and then look for changes over time.  

 

We Measure and Track- But then what? 

1.     Publicize·      

  • Integrate with existing reporting.  
  • Create a separate effectual dashboard or highlights report.
  • Tell your stories.

2.     Recognize

  • See successes – reward them
  • Acknowledge failures – learn from them

3.     Reorganize

  • Resistance?  Bring the discussion to what you’re really trying to accomplish and allow the input to shape future iterations.    

 

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  effectuation  entrepreneurial mindset  entrepreneurship  insights ignited  NACCE 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Eastern WV Community & Technical College Gets the Whole Community Speaking Effectuation

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Monday, February 23, 2015

Opportunities for Business Startups Available in Wardensville by Jean Flanagan

Reprint Courtesy of the Moorefield Examiner Newspaper, Moorefield WV February 4, 2015

As community colleges and NACCE members we talk about Effectuation (the Entrepreneurial Method) frequently, but Entrepreneur in Residence Joe Kapp & Eastern WV CTC President Chuck Terrell are taking it to the streets of their community and making it part of the local vocabulary on entrepreneurship and small business. Check out this great front page article from their local newspaper. This is definitely "Entrepreneurship in Action". 

For more information contact Joe Kapp at Joseph.Kapp@easternwv.edu


 Attached Files:

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  Eastern West Virginia Community and Technical Coll  economic development  effectuation  entrepreneurial mindset  entrepreneurship  NACCE 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Let's Talk Effectuation with Sara Whiffen

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Sunday, February 8, 2015

We invite you to share in a conversation with Sara Whiffen, Effectuation expert and the Coleman Foundation Entrepreneurial Colleges in Action grantees on a question that many of us deal with on our campuses every day. 

Which metrics or measurements do you think best capture the mindset of effectuation -- and why?

Please comment on this posting with your thoughts, ideas, and questions.

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  effectuation  entrepreneurial mindset  entrepreneurship  NACCE 

Share |
PermalinkComments (3)
 

Fox Valley TC Pilots an Accelerated Entrepreneurial Mindset Course

Posted By Christine Pigsley, Sunday, February 8, 2015

By: Douglas Schacht, Entrepreneurship Instructor,  Fox Valley Technical College, Appleton WI

For more information email: schacht@fvtc.edu 

The 2014-2015 Coleman Foundation Grant received by Fox Valley Technical College is focused on promoting and piloting an accelerated three-credit entrepreneurial mindset course as an elective for students in program areas that naturally lend themselves to self-employment (horticulture, residential construction, interior design, culinary arts, etc.).  The project was specifically designed to address Presidents for Entrepreneurship Pledge Action Steps 1, 2, 4, & 5.  We chose to create an accelerated, 5-day, 3-credit course to be taught during our January 2015 and August 2015 interim weeks.  Our goal was 15 students per class, and our inaugural class that recently wrapped up had 12 students in it from a variety of program areas. 

I recently completed reading and grading their final reflection papers and was pleasantly surprised by many of the comments shared by students.  The overarching theme went something like “I had no idea what to expect walking into this course but am so glad I took it.  After this experience I am more confident in my future than I ever could have imagined.”  Reflecting on those comments it seems clear that we did a good job helping those students embrace their internal locus of control and power to choose which is critical for these future entrepreneurs. 

A significant lesson learned is that we need to do a better job educating our internal stakeholders on what this course provides and use the students from this course as ambassadors in the recruitment process for the August course.  We will also be reaching out to our Student Life team to engage them in the shaping of this course and outcomes moving forward.

Tags:  Coleman Foundation  community college  effectuation  entrepreneurial mindset  entrepreneurship  fox valley technical college  NACCE 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 2
1  |  2
Community Search
Latest News
Upcoming Events

6/9/2018 » 6/11/2018
NACCE travels to Denver for GlobalMindED's Annual Conference

9/19/2018 » 9/21/2018
GO WEST! Making, Inventing, & Entrepreneurship: New Pathways & New Opportunities

NACCE | National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship
1 Federal St. Bldg. 101, Springfield, MA 01105
P: 413-306-3131 | F: 413-372-4992
Contact us now!